Milledgeville: Then and Now PART 3

From 1804 to 1868, the historic town of Milledgeville served as Georgia’s State Capitol. Modeled after Savannah and Washington D.C., the city has endured a number of changes ranging from Sherman’s March to the Sea to the establishment of Central State Hospital. But no matter how much change has taken place, the beauty and historic significance of Milledgeville’s iconic buildings has remained.

Georgia State College for Women / Parks Hall

Georgia State College for Women / Parks Hall

Pictured on the left is one of the several buildings among the campus of Georgia State College for Women. Before the school became Georgia College, it served as a women’s university that offered classes for aspiring teachers. Today, this particular building is known as Parks Hall, named after GC’s second president, Marvin McTeyire Parks.

Ina Dillard Russell Library

Ina Dillard Russell Library

The iconic library was renamed in 1932 to honor Ina, wife of Supreme Court Justice Richard B. Russell Sr. Though it has since been remodeled, the library has served as the heart of the Georgia College campus for decades.

Paine-Jones House

Paine-Jones House

At 201 S. Liberty St., the Paine-Jones House was built in 1820 by Joshua Paine in the Federal Style of architecture. Today, the house serves as a home and meeting place for the members of women’s fraternity Alpha Omicron Pi.

First United Methodist Church / Student Activity Center

First United Methodist Church / Student Activity Center

From 1913 to 2004, this gorgeous home served as Milledgeville’s First United Methodist Church. By 2005, Georgia College had purchased the old church and turned it into what is now the Student Activities Center. With Magnolia Ballroom as its premier space, the facility currently operates as a lounge, event space and office space for students. The church has since relocated to a much larger facility on Log Cabin Road.

Brown-Stetson-Sanford House

Brown-Stetson-Sanford House

Built in 1825 by John Marlor, this Federal Style home previously served as the Beecher-Brown Hotel, then the State’s Rights Hotel. Today, it exists as one of the rotating stops on our Historic Trolley Tour.

Orme-Sallee House

Orme-Sallee House

This historic home has been referred to as perhaps the best example of Milledgeville Federal Architectural Style. Built by John Williams in 1822, this was the home of Richard Orme, editor of the Southern Recorder,former Milledgeville newspaper.

Andalusia Farm

Andalusia Farm

This beautiful farmhouse served as the home of famed American author Flannery O’Connor from 1951 to 1964. The image on the left shows O’Connor photographed on the stairs. Today, Andalusia operates as an historic site and museum focused on the works and life of the author.

Newell-Watts House

Newell-Watts House

Built in 1825, this late Georgian Greek Revival home belonged to the Newell family for over 100 years. Prior to the Civil War, the home served as a meeting place for the aristocracy of the day and received frequent visits from Sidney Lanier. Today, Newell-Watts is home to Georgia College’s Office of Admissions.

 

Read more about our past with Milledgeville: Then and Now PART 1 and PART 2.

Author: Mallory Haynes

Mallory is a Senior Mass Communication major at Georgia College. She loves writing, traveling and listening to music. If you can’t find her, she’s either at a concert or sipping on an iced coffee at Blackbird.

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